Child Labour

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muhammadmohsinali
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Child Labour

Post by muhammadmohsinali » Sun Jun 12, 2011 12:25 pm

Considerable differences exist between the many kinds of work children do. Some are difficult and demanding, others are more hazardous and even morally reprehensible. Children carry out a very wide range of tasks and activities when they work. Defining child labourNot all work done by children should be classified as child labour that is to be targeted for elimination. Children’s or adolescents’ participation in work that does not affect their health and personal development or interfere with their schooling, is generally regarded as being something positive. This includes activities such as helping their parents around the home, assisting in a family business or earning pocket money outside school hours and during school holidays. These kinds of activities contribute to children’s development and to the welfare of their families; they provide them with skills and experience, and help to prepare them to be productive members of society during their adult life.The term “child labour” is often defined as work that deprives children of their childhood, their potential and their dignity, and that is harmful to physical and mental development. It refers to work that:is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful to children; andinterferes with their schooling by:depriving them of the opportunity to attend school;obliging them to leave school prematurely; orrequiring them to attempt to combine school attendance with excessively long and heavy work.In its most extreme forms, child labour involves children being enslaved, separated from their families, exposed to serious hazards and illnesses and/or left to fend for themselves on the streets of large cities – often at a very early age. Whether or not particular forms of “work” can be called “child labour” depends on the child’s age, the type and hours of work performed, the conditions under which it is performed and the objectives pursued by individual countries. The answer varies from country to country, as well as among sectors within countries.Worst forms of child labourWhilst child labour takes many different forms, a priority is to eliminate without delay the worst forms of child labour as defined by Article 3 of ILO Convention 182:(a) all forms of slavery or practices similar to slavery, such as the sale and trafficking of children, debt bondage and serfdom and forced or compulsory labour, including forced or compulsory recruitment of children for use in armed conflict;(b) the use, procuring or offering of a child for prostitution, for the production of pornography or for pornographic performances;(c) the use, procuring or offering of a child for illicit activities, in particular for the production and trafficking of drugs as defined in the relevant international treaties;(d) work which, by its nature or the circumstances in which it is carried out, is likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children.Labour that jeopardises the physical, mental or moral well-being of a child, either because of its nature or because of the conditions in which it is carried out, is known as “hazardous work” Guidance for governments on some hazardous child labour activities which should be prohibited is given in the accompanying Recommendation 190 Concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination Worst Forms of Child Labour 1999: 3. In determining the types of work referred to under Article3(d) of the Convention, and in identifying where they exist, consideration should be given, inter alia, to:(a) work which exposes children to physical, psychological or sexual abuse;(b) work underground, under water, at dangerous heights or in confined spaces;(c) work with dangerous machinery, equipment and tools, or which involves the manual handling or transport of heavy loads;(d) work in an unhealthy environment which may, for example, expose children to hazardous substances, agents or processes, or to temperatures, noise levels, or vibrations damaging to their health;(e) work under particularly difficult conditions such as work for long hours or during the night or work where the child is unreasonably confined to the premises of the employer.Pak Govt apathetic in curbing rising child labourLike the others parts of the globe, the World Day against Child Labour is being observed in Pakistan on 12-06-2011. This year the International Labor Organisation (ILO) has set the theme of the day as “Hazardous Child Labour”. The day is aimed at provision of a global spotlight on hazardous child labour, and call for urgent action to tackle the problem. The ILO launched the first World Day against Child Labour in 2002 as a way to highlight the plight of labourer children. The day, which is observed on June 12 every year, is intended to serve as a catalyst for the growing worldwide movement against child labour, reflected in a number of ratifications of ILO Convention No 182 on the worst forms of child labour and ILO Convention No 138 on the minimum age for employment.The ILO’s most recent global estimate is that 115 million children are involved in hazardous work. This is work that by its nature or the circumstances, in which it is carried out, is likely to harm children’s health, safety or morals. Children working in many different industries and occupations can be exposed to such risks and the problem is global, affecting industrialized as well as developing countries.The government of Pakistan ratified the ILO Convention on the Worst Forms of Child Labour (182) in August 2001 and is obligated to take steps to remove children from these occupations. A first step would be to include the national list of hazardous forms of child labour for Pakistan under the schedule of occupations in which the employment of children is prohibited under the Employment of Children Act 1991.According to a survey, 3.3 million child labourers are involved in economic activities in the country both in formal and informal sectors including factories, football industry, printing industry, agriculture beside beggary. The activists working for the rights of children said that the government was not serious to take positive steps to eradicate the menace. Sahiba Irfan of the Society for the Protection of the Rights of the Child (SPARC) said government had not taken any concrete step to implement the Convention on the Rights of the Children (CRC) in the country in letter and spirit. She demanded of the government to accelerate actions for children. Iftikhar of SAHIL said that the government should show commitment and come up with effective steps for improving the state of children rights in the country, and enforce a ban on hazardous occupations under the Employment of Children Act 1991. He said education was very basic right of a child and the government was responsible to provide equal education facilities to the children. But unfortunately, he added, the rulers had no attention on the problems faced by a layman while their own children were studding abroad. Talking on the causes of child labour, he said poverty and illiteracy were the main reasons behind the day by day souring issue.


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mjahanzaibzia
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Re: Child Labour

Post by mjahanzaibzia » Sun Jun 12, 2011 11:21 pm

Dear aaj kal Child hi to 'Naik-Niyyete' se kaam krtay hain, 'Bray' to bechaaray Petrol, Aata, Cheene, Gas or Bijli dhoondnay mai lagay hotay hain. Or jo baqi hain wo aa'ay din Stikes pe hotay hain.......Do you know why there is still Child Labour in our Country??Reasons:1. Childs do Max. Work with Sincerity & take less wages than Young people.2. Cirumstances are going too worst, a single person can't afford to meet all expenses of the family.3. Govt. has not made any effort to minimise child labor. There are only the Laws but you know these Laws are Bookish only,,,,,, they are not for implimentation.4. Minimum Wage Rate in Pakistan is Rs. 7000/- currently & nobody is mostly willing to work with this pay, as he can not meet all of his expenses with this wage rate; therefore, Employers try to get alternate of it & they easily employee Childs with only Rs. 3000/- as their wages.Solutions:1. Laws pertaining to Child Labour should be implimented with no delays. These Laws should also be regulated & supervised after their implimentation.2. Minimum Wage Rate in Pakistan is Rs. 7000/- currently, however, this is supposed to be increased to Rs. 8000/- in FI-2011-12, Do anybody think that one can meet all his expenses with this amount??3. We are making our circumstances worst ourselves, we should stop all this non-sense. A thing got Rs. 5 per 50Kg bag in increase & we increse the price of the commodity by Rs. 5 per kg. What is this?? Is Govt. involved here? Definitly NO. On the other hand, Govt. should control Prices of different commodities. but here, we are the only reason to make things more expensive.
:: J ahanzaib Z ia

mehamgul101
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Re: Child Labour

Post by mehamgul101 » Wed Aug 10, 2011 10:19 am

wow very nice sharing with the community of this forum and thanks for it


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